MCCC Begins Phase II on Riverfront Center

I recently received the following press release from Montgomery County Community College and added the photo so readers would know what building is being renovated.

140 College Drive

 

June 15, 2011, Pottstown, Pa.—As residents of Pottstown and its surrounding communities head to theSchuylkill River and its trails for recreation this summer, they will see a flurry of activity at 140 College Drive – the future home of the Riverfront Academic and Heritage Center.

Montgomery County Community College is currently in phase II of the renovation that will transform the facility, commonly referred to as “the old PECO building,” into a state-of-the-art educational center. Phase II work includes improvements to the building’s infrastructure and exterior envelope, including the installation of sustainable features that will support LEED certification.

Specifically, phase II will include replacement of the building’s aged, leaking roof with an eco-friendly green roof, along with the installation of energy efficient windows. A new entrance and handicap-accessible ramp will also be created. Phase II work is slated for completion in September.

When funding becomes available, phase III work will focus on the building’s interior, including the development of classrooms, offices and student spaces. A variety of sponsorship and funding opportunities are available to help bring the proposed Riverfront Academic and Heritage Center to fruition. To learn more, visit www.mc3.edu/giving or call the College’s Foundation at 215-641-6535.

The completed Center will provide space for four college classrooms equipped with SMART technology, a state-of-the-art laboratory that will support the College’s Environmental Science degree program, and an interpretive center that will provide educational, historic and tourist information about the Schuylkill River Heritage Area (SRHA).

In May 2010, the College completed phase I of the project by renovating the site’s parking lot. Renovations included removing contaminated soil, installing underground drainage facilities, adding clean fill, installing a blacktop cap to protect the groundwater table, and constructing three bio-retention basins to capture stormwater runoff. Installation of LED lighting and the placement of more than 130 trees, shrubs and bushes make the lot more sustainable.

The building at 140 College Drive served the Pottstown community as an electrical generating station starting in 1911.  After sitting vacant for a number of years, the building and three-acre site were purchased by the Borough of Pottstown. The College secured ownership of the site in April 2009, and enjoys a unique partnership with the SRHA, which leases office space in the building.

J.O.B. Design & Construction and Hetrick Gardens

Better late than never! Here are some photos from Positively!Pottstown’s May Happy Hour, hosted by Johnny and Pam O’Boyle of J.O.B. Design & Construction and Halo Energy. Their office is located at 64 N. Hanover Street in a beautifully renovated building that was Dr. Gaffney’s home and office for many years.

We had a wonderful time with food by Karen and Chris Foster of Positively Pasta (115 E. High Street, 484-945-1007) and tours available to see the beautiful original woodwork and craftsmanship of the renovation by John and his crews.

The colorful planters at the front door were provided by Hetrick Gardens, which is run by Matt Hetrick. His landscape and nursery center is located at 2620 Swamp Pike, Pottstown, PA. They’re on the web at www.hetrickgardens.com.

Thanks again to everyone who made this another fine gathering!!

What’s on tap in Pottstown – June 24

Bees, Butterflies, Beaches and Bridges: The Gallery On High’s Summer Member Show Is running now through August 13th. The Gallery on High is located at254 E. High Street. Their hours are: Tuesday – Friday from 10am to 4:30pm, Saturday from 10am to 3pm. They’re closed on Sunday and Monday. For more info, visit their website: www. GalleryonHigh.com.

This next event might not be right in Pottstown, but if you’re in the mood for some good, old-fashioned polka fun, oldies, country, big band music – whatever – get yourself over to the band shell at Sanatoga Park for the Bill Koss Combo, this Sunday night, June 26th, beginning at 6 pm. I have to give a shout-out to the Kosses because my dad used to play trumpet at gigs with their founder “Itchy” Koss when I was growing up. And the Positively Pottstown blog featured Sanatoga Park in last fall’s Parks & Rec Series, sponsored by the Pottstown Area Health and Wellness Foundation. Lower Pottsgrove puts on a 6-week summer concert series at Sanatoga Park with Exelon Nuclear again sponsoring this year. For the whole line-up, check out the Township’s website at www.lowerpottsgrove.org.

Next Thursday, June 30, the Pottstown Regional Public Library will host a performance of the Ill Style and Peace Dance Troupe. The event starts at 4 pm and is open to all. The Library is at500 E High St. See their website for more news about this and other summer events and programming for all ages. Their website is www.ppl.mclinc.org

When you’re ready to unwind on this Saturday night or any Saturday night, head on over to Sunnybrook Ballroom for their weekly “Hot Summer Nights” at The Tiki Hut. There are drink specials, music and dancing for the 21 and over crowd. Sunnybrook is located at 50 N. Sunnybrook Rd, Pottstown. Check out all their upcoming music and entertainment at www.sunnybrookballroom.net.

The Evolution of Bullying

This is the third article in a series on bullying, provided by the Pottstown Area Health & Wellness Foundation.

THE EVOLUTION OF BULLYING:

FROM SCHOOLYARD TO CYBERSPACE

By: David Kraybill, Executive Director, Pottstown Area Health & Wellness Foundation

Would you be surprised to know that according to current statistics released by the U.S. Department of Justice 77% of students admit to being bullied mentally, verbally or physically according to a recent national survey? That translates to one in four kids being bullied. Eight percent of students miss one day of class per month from fear of bullies. One out of five kids admits to being a bully or doing some bullying. You may not only be surprised, but downright alarmed.  Unfortunately, bullying is a widespread and serious problem. It’s not a phase children have to go through, it’s not just “kids being kids,” and it’s not something children will grow out of. Bullying is a serious situation that can cause lasting harm to both the victim and the bully.

Granted, bullying has been around forever. So why is it only now getting the attention it deserves? Is it because there is now global awareness that children are committing suicide from being bullied? Is it because there are now other, sneakier ways to bully than the schoolyard, such as cyberbullying? Is it because it’s now affecting a larger number of kids than ever before? Yes, yes and yes.

Definition of Bullying
Bullying is aggressive behavior that is intentional and involves an imbalance of power or strength. It involves repeated acts; physical, emotional and/or inappropriate social behavior; it is intentional, controlling and hurtful; and it is a learned behavior, sometimes as early as age two. Bully power comes from physical size and strength, verbal skills, popularity and gender.

Physical or verbal bullying includes hitting, kicking, pushing, tripping, name-calling, cruel teasing, threatening and/or intimidating words, sexual harassment, ethnic slurs, spreading rumors, group exclusion, stares and glares, unreasonable territorial bans, and destruction of property. Cyberbullying includes the creation of insulting or threatening websites; ISP warning wars; harassing instant messages, emails or text messages; chat room gossip; rating sites/internet polling; suicide sites; conspiring and excluding online; impersonation, password stealing, and harassment during online games.

Statistics indicate bullying is more prevalent in middle school (grades 6-8) than in senior high school. Emotional or verbal bullying is the most common form of bullying with pushing, shoving, tripping and spitting on someone being the second most common form. Cyberbullying, however, is more prevalent in the last three years of high school than in grades six through nine.

Portrait of a Bully
Of course, there is no typical bully, but there are various behaviors that bullies or potential bullies may exhibit. These include:
• Demonstrating aggressive behavior with others including parents and teachers
• Frequently hitting or pushing other children
• Seeking to dominate and or manipulate
• Enjoying feeling powerful and in control (whether real or not)
• Being physically strong and socially dominant

• Appearing to derive satisfaction from other’s fears, discomfort or pain, and lacking empathy  for others

• Being emotionally immature, irresponsible and not accepting responsibility for their actions

    • Hiding bad behaviors or doing them where adults cannot notice
• Displaying uncontrolled anger and an intolerance and prejudice toward others

Bullies often have assistants or watchers that help them carry out the bully behavior. Multiple studies have shown that peers are present in more than 85 percent of bullying incidents. Many times the watchers want to be accepted by the bully and his or her group or fear that the bully will turn on them if they intervene. Watchers also develop a logic that the victim deserved it, and they don’t really see the victim as a person. Unfortunately, watchers do not consider the consequences of their actions or those of the bully. Some researchers actually believe that the watchers and witnesses to the bullying are the key to eliminating bullying behavior because this group is the sizable majority in any school.

Portrait of a Victim
Unfortunately, no child is immune to being bullied, but there are certain types of kids who may be more susceptible to being a victim—including popular children. Bullies tend to pick on kids who:
• Are anxious, insecure or cautious
• Suffer from low self-esteem
• Are the most popular
• Are isolated or quiet
• Rarely defend themselves or retaliate when confronted
• Lack social skills and friends
• Tend to be close to their parents or may have overprotective parents
• Are minorities, physically disabled or have a visible defect

The effects of bullying, whether a child is the victim or the aggressor, can last a lifetime. Behaviors, attitudes and hurts can manifest over time if left unaddressed, and become ways that children use to define themselves as they grow into adulthood. Long-term effects can include delinquent or criminal behavior such as incarceration or gang activities, as well as decreased self-esteem, long-term depression, becoming an adult bully at home or in the workplace, or becoming a child- and/or spouse-abuser.

If your child is a victim of bullying or is a bully, the first place to start is to recognize and acknowledge what is happening, and then find resources that can help you work together as a family to resolve the situation. One such resource is The Pottstown Area Health & Wellness Foundation’s Mission Healthy Living website. You can view webisodes that address various topics on bullying and feature expert local guests at http://www.missionhealthyliving.org.
About the Foundation  The Pottstown Area Health & Wellness Foundation’s mission is to enhance the health and wellness of area residents, providing education, funding and programs that motivate people to adopt healthy lifestyles. Visit www.pottstownfoundation.org for more information about the Foundation. Discover Pottstown area’s new online community at www.missionhealthyliving.org to learn and share great information on how to lead a healthier life!

What to do when your child is being bullied

This is the second article in a series on bullying, provided by the Pottstown Area Health & Wellness Foundation.

WHAT CAN PARENTS DO WHEN THEIR CHILD IS BEING BULLIED?

Plus, Tips To Help Kids Heal And Move On

 

By: David Kraybill, Executive Director, Pottstown Area Health & Wellness Foundation

It’s a helpless feeling when you know your child is hurting and you’re not sure how to fix the problem or even where to begin. What would you do if you discover your child is being bullied? Your initial inclination might be to stop the bullying, but that may actually do more harm than good.  But, there are things that can be done to begin to alleviate the situation and work toward a resolution.

What You Should Not Do
Once you’ve determined your child is being bullied, you may think it’s a good idea to call and talk to the bully’s parents. This can be detrimental, especially if the child you think is the culprit is not the right child—this can be especially true with cyberbullying. Also, if the parent does take action and punish his or her child, the child may turn around and make even more trouble for your child.

Trying to mediate a bullying situation yourself by bringing together your child and the bully to “work it out” is not a good idea either. It may further traumatize your child and send the wrong message to both parties. Remember, bullying is a form of victimization; it’s not a conflict. Other things that parents should not do include:

• Asking your child to solve the bullying problem. The child will likely suffer further. This is not
something that will go away on its own and requires adult intervention.
• Advising your child to fight back—this may violate a school conduct code and your child may be
seriously injured. Plus, answering violence with more violence only perpetuates the problem.
• Blaming your child. It’s likely she has done nothing to provoke the bullying. However, have an honest
look at your child’s social skills and behaviors. If your child is hyperactive, impulsive or overly
talkative, the bully may be reacting out of annoyance. This doesn’t make the bullying right, but
it may offer an explanation. If your child easily irritates people, seek help from a counselor so that your
child can better learn the informal social rules of his or her peer group.
• Allowing or encouraging your child to respond to threatening messages or texts—this can backfire on
your child. Don’t respond, and start to save all evidence.

What You Should Do
There are three major steps parents should take when they find out their child is being bullied or cyberbullied.

Step One – Gather Information
Many kids are embarrassed to say they have been bullied—you may have only one chance to step in—so listen carefully and learn as much as you can. It’s important to take the bullying seriously. You also should emphasize with your child that bullying is wrong, not his fault and praise him for telling you about it. As you’re talking, gather all the information on what has been happening—where, when, how, who. Then create a written record and have your child start to keep a journal of all instances. If the bullying is or includes cyberbulling, keep all texts and emails, and print out and SAVE all evidence. Don’t wait until your list gets longer or your child’s journal fills up—it’s important to address the situation as soon as you are aware of it, but continue keeping track of the situation. Be sure to keep the lines of communication open with your child.

Step Two – Contact the School
If the bullying is occurring at school make the school aware of the situation. You should also ask to see the school’s bullying policy. The school should investigate your concerns and inform you of the outcome. Give them a reasonable amount of time to investigate both sides of the story—however, it should not take more than a week. Do not expect that you will be part of any meeting with the children involved or your child. This could be embarrassing and intimidating for your child. If the bullying continues and the school is not doing anything else, you should contact school administrators or the superintendent for help. Don’t give up. Remain persistent and ask that you are kept informed at all times.

If the bullying does not occur at school, it is still a good idea to alert your child’s teacher or principal so they are aware of the situation and can watch for any unacceptable behaviors.

Step Three – Educate Your Child
While the bully situation is being addressed, take time to educate your child about how to act if a bullying episode occurs. First, she should just avoid the bully as best she can. If she must see the bully, your child should put on a poker face and act as though the bully’s behavior does not bother her and walk away as soon as possible. You can also teach your child safety strategies, like seeking help from an adult if she feels threatened. Above all else, make sure your child has a safe and loving home environment where she can take shelter and express her feelings in a non-judgmental way.

After Care
After your child has been the victim of bullying and it has come to an end, there are ways to help your child become more resilient to bullying and maybe prevent further incidents. Suggest and facilitate activities for him to get involved in, like music, sports or art outside the school environment—a fresh start with some new peers can build confidence. Encourage him to make contact with the friendlier students—his or her teacher may be able to suggest such students. You can also role-play how your child should react if someone starts to bully him again. It might seem awkward at first, but it will give your child practice in being assertive and brave, but not aggressive. He needs to feel he can retain power in a bullying situation.

Unfortunately, the effects of bullying can last a lifetime if left unaddressed. Behaviors, attitudes and hurts can manifest over time and become ways that children use to define themselves as they grow into adulthood. Long-term effects can include decreased self-esteem, long-term depression, anxiety, loneliness, withdrawal, suicidal ideation, and actually becoming an adult bully at home or in the workplace, or becoming a child- and/or spouse-abuser.

So remember, the most important thing to remember is do not keep quiet about bullying incidents. Hold the bully accountable for his or her actions, because no child should have to suffer in silence and hope it goes away—it won’t.

About the Foundation  The Pottstown Area Health & Wellness Foundation’s mission is to enhance the health and wellness of area residents, providing education, funding and programs that motivate people to adopt healthy lifestyles. Visit www.pottstownfoundation.org for more information about the Foundation. Discover Pottstown area’s new online community at www.missionhealthyliving.org to learn and share great information on how to lead a healthier life!

Signs Your Child May be Bullied

This week we’ll be running a series of articles on bullying from the Pottstown Area Health & Wellness Foundation. Bullying, which is usually hidden from adults, can have long-lasting physical and emotional consequences for the victims. Please check out these articles and if you find them helpful, pass them along to parents and other adults in your network. I also invite you to check out the newest online community for living a healthier life at www.missionhealthyliving.org .

WHAT ARE THE WARNING SIGNS THAT YOUR CHILD

MIGHT BE BEING BULLIED?

By: David Kraybill, Executive Director

Pottstown Area Health & Wellness Foundation

You’ve been noticing your child is not quite himself or herself lately. You cannot exactly pinpoint it, but there is something wrong. Is he moody and angry because his hormones are kicking in? Is it just that typical tween or teenager “attitude” rearing its head? Hey, no child is enthusiastic about going to school all of the time, right?

If these questions have crossed your mind, you may be trying to justify your child’s change in behavior. Of course, it very well could be hormones or that he or she would just rather be doing something else besides going to school that day. However, resist the urge to brush this change in behavior under the rug or think it will go away. You know your child best, and if his or her behavior is sudden or out of character, delve deeper.

There are many reasons a child may be acting out of character, but one might be that he is being bullied at school or is being cyber-bullied. And yes, it’s likely he did not tell you what is happening out of embarrassment or fear.

Portrait of a Victim
The rise in bullying is, unfortunately, a reality in our middle and high schools. The National Youth Violence Prevention Network reports that about 30 percent of students (more than 5.7 million young people) are involved in bullying—either as the bully, the one who is bullied, or both. So, it’s very likely that incidences involving bullying will touch your child’s life at some point. So, while no child is immune to being bullied, there are certain types of kids who may be more susceptible to being a victim. Bullies tend to pick on kids who:

• Are anxious, insecure or cautious
• Suffer from low self-esteem
• Are the most popular
• Are isolated or quiet
• Rarely defend themselves or retaliate when confronted
• Lack social skills and friends
• Tend to be close to their parents or may have overprotective parents
• Are minorities, physically disabled or have a visible defect

Warning Signs
There are a number of warning signs parents can look for that indicate their child may be being bullied. While no one warning sign below creates a case that your child is being bullied, these are signs that you should not be ignore and you should investigate further with your child.

Sudden change in attitude toward school – adolescent teens change their attitudes, likes and dislikes with super speed, but if your tween or teen’s attitude changes suddenly and dramatically and she no longer has an interest in going to school or doing her schoolwork, then it warrants further investigation.

Seems afraid of going to school, walking to and from school, riding the bus or participating in organized activities with peers – if a child is being bullied, she is going to make every effort to avoid any situation where she knows it is going to happen or be alone with the bully or with a group that is bullying. Another alert is if she starts to take an illogical or out-of-the-way route home.

Unexplained cuts, bruises or other injuries – kids fall, run into things (and each other), trip and slip, but there is a difference between run-of-the-mill bumps, scrapes and bruises and bully abuse. If your child starts to have frequent unexplained injuries, or has torn or ripped clothing he didn’t have before he left for school, it could be evidence of bullying.

Starts to lose or misplace belongings or money – kids can be absent-minded and not always the most responsible, but if your child is normally responsible and careful about his things and his money and all of a sudden things he cares about “go missing,” it could be because bullies are threatening him and taking his stuff and lunch money.

Significant drop in grades – imagine trying to get through the school day while dodging a gauntlet of threats, intimidating looks, physical harassment, etc. in the hallway at 45 minutes intervals. You are not going to be focused on your classes. The bully may have created a posse and an environment of fear and apprehension—all of which can lead to a less-than-stellar academic performance for the victim.

Persistent requests to stay home because of hard-to-prove illnesses, such as stomachaches or headaches – mental anguish can manifest itself as physical discomfort, and stress can lead to headaches, and fear can result in abdominal pain. When your child claims he is too sick to go to school or a school-related activity, this may be the truth or it may be a symptom of abuse-related anxiety. He could also have created a phantom sickness to avoid seeing the bully or bullies.

Changes in eating habits or sleep patterns – the effects of bullying don’t disappear the moment the abuser is out of sight. If your child is being bullied, the pain and fear won’t dissipate once the dismissal bell rings. In fact, with this age of technology, the end of school may signal just the start of a long night of cyber-bullying. This trauma can affect sleep and eating patterns.

Changes in social patterns, activities and friends – adolescence is a time of change, and tweens and teens can change friends and groups like the wind. But, if your child has suddenly abandoned old friends, withdrawn from once-treasured activities or lost interest in hobbies that once held great significance, it’s time to do a little digging. Again, you’re not only looking for changes, but changes that are sudden and unexplainable by your child.

Mood swings, angry outbursts or other emotional changes – yes, once again, this can be “typical” teenager behavior, but if your normally mild-mannered child suddenly turns into a walking basket case or has uncharacteristic outbursts, this is a sign something is wrong. Since bullying is very traumatic, and people respond to trauma in different ways, this may be misdirected repressed anger.

The effects of bullying can last a lifetime. Behaviors, attitudes and hurts can manifest over time if left unaddressed, and become ways that children use to define themselves as they grow into adulthood. Long-term effects can include decreased self-esteem, long-term depression, anxiety, loneliness, withdrawal, suicidal ideation, and actually becoming an adult bully at home or in the workplace, or becoming a child and/
or spouse-abuser.

If you suspect your child is a victim of bullying, the first place to start is to recognize and acknowledge what is happening, and then talk to your child and ask some subtle questions to probe further and understand the situation. The next step would be to talk to the school and the administration. The most important thing to remember is do not keep quiet about bullying incidents. Many times parents and children are afraid it will worsen if they tell someone, but this is another form of control that the bully forces on the victim. It doesn’t hold the bully accountable for his or her actions—no child should have to
suffer in silence and hope it goes away—it won’t.

About the Foundation

The Pottstown Area Health & Wellness Foundation’s mission is to enhance the health and wellness of area residents, providing education, funding and programs that motivate people to adopt healthy lifestyles. Visit www.pottstownfoundation.org for more information about the Foundation. Discover Pottstown area’s new online community at www.missionhealthyliving.org to learn and share geat information on how to lead a healthier life!

Pottstown’s weekend at a glance

Peter Pan, A Musical Adventure is in its final days at the Tri-County Peforming Arts Center! It runs through this Sunday, June 19. TriPAc is located at 245 E. High Street, Pottstown, PA 19464. This is the U.S. premier of a new version of Peter Pan, and, yes, it’s happening right here in Pottstown. Go to TrIPAC.org to order our tickets online now. You won’t want to miss it!

Get out of the gate early on Saturday, June 18 and check out the Pottstown Soap Box Derby race, sponsored by the Ambucs. It will take place on the Wilson Street hill off Farmington Avenue. Area kids will compete for the chance to run in the All-American Soap Box Derby in Akron, Ohio.

A Summer Solstice Celebration is happening at Smith Plaza tomorrow, June 18. It includes The Gallery School’s community yard sale and lots of live music. WPAZ will be broadcasting live from 10-noon. The Celebration also includes the 2nd Annual PottsMUTTster Dog Show from 9:00am to 2:00pm at Smith Family Plaza, right in front of Borough Hall in Pottstown, PA. Bring your pooch and compete for such honors as Best Singing Mutt and Best Mystery Mutt. REGISTRATION is from 9:00 am to 11:00 am. EVENTS take place from 11:00am to 2:00 pm. It all benefits the Montgomery County SPCA.

Also taking place tomorrow at Pottstown’s Riverfront Park is the 2nd Annual 5K/1M Race to Shelter the Homeless sponsored by Wings of Victory Outreach Corp. Riverfront Park is located at 140 College Drive.

Registration starts at 7:30am – Race starts at 8:30am. There’s a $30 registration fee – Moms & Dads with strollers are welcome!

Contact email: wings.victory@yahoo.com or visit their website at www.wingsofvictoryoutreach.org

Wings of Victory Outreach Corp. was formed to provide housing and life skills training for homeless or near homeless individuals. They offer a holistic approach and give a hand up by offering programs that develop self sufficiency through housing, employment, education, and character building. Participants gain the skills needed to function responsibly and effectively in daily life.  

And when you’re ready to unwind on Saturday night, head on over to Sunnybrook Ballroom for their weekly “Hot Summer Nights” at The Tiki Hut. There are drink specials, music and dancing for the 21 and over crowd. Sunnybrook is located at50 N. Sunnybrook Rd,Pottstown. Check out all their upcoming music and entertainment at http://www.sunnybrookballroom.net.

Summer Camps in Pottstown-from art to science and everything in between

If you have kids, you know that the “I’m bored” can start as early as the first week of summer vacation, but you don’t have to get out of town to find something fun, interesting and maybe even (gasp) educational for the elementary school set to do this summer.  There are camps right here in Pottstown that offer art, drama, science and sports.  Here are some highlights:

Tri-County Performing Arts Center

Village Productions is offering 3 sessions of camp, each running 2 weeks for kids in 1st grade through high school.  Learn acting, voice and dance at our local theater and get the chance to audition for Willy Wonka Junior which will be performed by camp participants in August.  The sessions are July 11-22; July 25-August 5; and August 8-19. 

9am – 4pm for 5th – 12th Grades

9am – 4pm for 1st – 4th Grades

Half-day camp option for 1st through 4th Grades

9am – noon or 1pm – 4pm

There are scholarships available and you can check the Tri-Pac website for more information about the camps and financial aid. 

The Gallery on High

The School at the Gallery on High definitely does not take the summer off; in fact there are tons of opportunities for both kids and adults to get their hands dirty with clay, learn to sew and explore the arts.  With classes starting and running throughout the summer,  it’s easy to fit in a class or two for your kids, even when you have vacations planned or they start sports practices. 

For the 4-7 set, there’s the Story Sculpting class, which gives kids the opportunity to make art inspired by favorite books like the Berenstein Bears.  For older kids, the Native American Life Skills pottery class sounds amazing.  Students will actually find clay in Riverfront Park and use it to make pottery in the same way that Native Americans once did. 

You can check out all their class offerings and get more information about membership by checking out their website:  Gallery On High.

Sports Camps

If sports are more your kids’ thing, there’s no shortage of choices right here in Pottstown. 

  • The Tennis Farm offers weekly camps throughout the summer at the Hill School.   
  • The 422 Sportsplex has camps for soccer, lacrosse, field hockey, cheerleading and more. 
  • Pottsgrove Soccer Club is hosting several different camps for kids in all grades and at all ability levels this summer, and you don’t have to be a Pottsgrove resident to sign up for camps or for the soccer program there in the fall. 

Science

Montgomery County Community College is offering a great opportunity for kids ages 8-16, called Kids on Campus.  This 10 week STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) program offers CSI, Lego Robotics, Computer Animation and more.  For more information and pricing, contact MontCo at 610-718-1861 or check out their website for details. 

History

Pottsgrove Manor Historic Site is giving kids a chance to see what it would have been like to live like the Potts Family.  This week long camp is for kids in grades 4 through 6 who love history and would like to spend their days living in the 18th century.  The program runs July 11-15th and you can find registration information on Pottsgrove Manor’s website.  

Of course, there’s always the pool, the parks and just hanging around at home-which can be a great way to reconnect with your kids and give them some downtime in the summer.

 

Another happy Happy Hour

OMG. YUM.
A huge thank you to Tom Abbott, Nancy March and The Mercury for hosting yesterday’s Happy Hour; it was one of the best. Seems their Community Media Lab was just the right size to cause about 60-70 people to literally rub elbows, meet new folks and network.

The gorgeous food shown in these pictures was provided by Chef Michael Falcone and his Funky Lil’ Kitchen… Cucumber with salmon, shots of strawberry soup with a drizzle of creme fraiche, hummus, white bean bruschetta, little dollops of goat cheese on puff pastry and more, every bite a sophisticated taste sensation.

We were also treated to a donation of beer by Sly Fox Brewery. They’re new to Pottstown, moving their brewing operation to the Circle of Progress in the Pottstown Airport Business Center. See The Mercury’s story from today’s paper here. Thank you, John Giannopoulos, and welcome to Pottstown!

I still need to confirm the location of the next Happy Hour, but the date is set: Friday, July 15 at 5 pm. Hope to see you then!

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